Planted Torreya Trees in Florida Panhandle
outside of Torreya State Park


1. Mature Torreyas of Madison, FL

In 2012 Dolly Ballard, a long-time resident and garden club member of Madison Florida, began to inventory the half-dozen mature Torreya trees on private properties in Madison, Florida. Apparently, in August 2012 she discovered 2 female Torreyas covered with lots of ripening seeds in a cemetery in Madison. Her nephew, Ben Duval, posted on YouTube a video of Dolly talking about the trees, and then (at 11:05) interviewing Park Ranger Mark Ludlow, on location in Torreya State Park, about the plight of the trees, which is embedded below:




2. Shoal Sanctuary (Florida Panhandle)
Nurturance of Torreya taxifolia
  

   VIDEO 2015-A: Torreya Trees at Shoal Sanctuary FL: Four Torreyas on Sandy Uplands

Chris Larson of Shoal Sanctuary, Florida, shows the four Torreya trees thriving since their planting in 2001. Of note: (1) only one tree has grown reproductive structures (male); (2) one survived a severe burn amid the longleaf pines; (3) all are thriving in nearly full sunlight on sandy soils; (4) agricultural lime is applied only rarely (when the evergreen leaves show yellowing); and (5) all four specimens are watered twice weekly.

10 minutes - published February 17, 2015.

   VIDEO 2015-B: Torreya Trees at Shoal Sanctuary FL: Grotto Ravine (preparing to plant seeds)

Connie Barlow identifies sites for 18 seeds of Torreya taxifolia to be planted in the moist, cool habitat of Grotto Ravine, within Shoal Sanctuary, Florida. Connie walks with camera through the ravine, speaking about why this spring-fed sandstone ravine in the Florida panhandle might be the best place for Florida Torreya to make a last stand in its home state.

    28 minutes - published February 21, 2015.

   PHOTO-ESSAY: Children Plant Seeds of Endangered Tree at Shoal Sanctuary

In March 2015 Chris Larson organized groups of scout, church, and other youth to plant seeds of Torreya taxifolia that were donated for this purpose by Torreya Guardians.

Click for Full-page photo-essay.

Shoal Sanctuary:

1475 Crowder Chapel Road, Mossy Head, FL 32434

  • Access FULL REPORT of Shoal Sanctuary Torreya Efforts (which includes videos and photo-essays above, along with more captioned photos and data reports).



    3. SW Escambia County
    180 miles west of Torreya State Park, FL

    Update April 2013, from Glenn Butts (retired marine biologist):

    I attach 2 photos of my torreya that I planted about a year ago. The plant came from Dod & Dod Nursery in Semmes, AL. They are propagated from lateral cuttings. I am located in extreme SW Escambia County, FL about 180 miles west of Torreya State Park. The overstory here are mature laurel oak and live oak. Saw Palmetto comprises the ground cover, with blueberries and devilwood the understory. Typically dry sand pine, oak flatwoods, although I have many areas heavily composted with home made compost. Lat/Long for this torreya is 30 20 03.37 N and 87 20 06.77 W at a 20 foot elevation. I doubt this area ever planted in cotton, so I am hopeful the soil pathogen is not in my soil. I do treat with HI-Yield Maneb in Feb and June as a precaution.

       

       LEFT: "The T. taxifolia still looks good I think
    with decent spring growth. I periodically use
    ag lime maybe twice a month. I use a
    water soluble general fertilizer every 10 days
    until end of May. I will treat soil and leaves
    with Hi-Yield Maneb
    in June. This will be
    its second growing season at this site."

    May 2013

       LEFT: "The torreya still looks good I think. I treat the soil with Hi-Yield Maneb fungicide in February, late March, and finally in May. I fertilize with Miracle Grow water-soluable fertilizer from March thru June. I also use ag lime around the root base any time during the year. This should be the start of its fourth growing season at this location. Slow grower indeed."

    April 2014




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